Do you sweat? You are most likely deficient in magnesium.

Krav_Maga_Sweat

Do you sweat?  You are most likely deficient in magnesium. 

Other predisposing factors include being a pre-menopausal female or taking oral contraceptives, antibiotics, corticosteroids, anticoagulants or diuretics.

Symptoms of magnesium deficiency include:

  • Craving chocolate
  • Constipation
  • Brain fog
  • Poor sleep quality
  • Muscle cramps
  • Menstrual cramps
  • Feeling “keyed up,”  or not being able to calm down
  • Headaches
  • Chronic fatigue

The reason a magnesium deficiency can cause this wide range of symptoms is because it is an essential cofactor in a wide range of processes in the body. 

Magnesium is used as a cofactor in energy metabolism.
People who generate large amounts energy (i.e. all of us at the Krav Maga Worldwide Training Centers) put a high demand on metabolic pathways like the Krebs cycle, which consumes a lot of magnesium. This is why we are predisposed to a magnesium deficiency.  Since magnesium has such a crucial role in energy metabolism, magnesium deficiency can present as chronic fatigue syndrome.

Magnesium is used in the synthesis of calming neurotransmitters.
These neurotransmitters like GABA can relax muscles and ease cramps, assure a more restful sleep, and even provide a sense of overall calm and wellbeing.

Magnesium is an electrolyte.
Magnesium is a small element that can carry an electric charge in your body, which means it can carry important cellular messages.  “Brain fog” can happen when these messages aren’t being delivered appropriately.
Water follows electrolytes, so water is allocated to different body compartments based on the movement of magnesium.  For example, taking magnesium supplements can cause more water to be held in the colon, which can relieve constipation.  It can also encourage more water to hydrate the brain, which relieves headaches.
This movement of water and electrolytes also explains why magnesium is easily lost in sweat-just another reason why athletes are predisposed for a deficiency.

Have you decided you need magnesium yet? 

Instead of reaching for some questionable generic magnesium supplement, get your magnesium from organic spinach and other dark green leafy veggies, and soaked and dehydrated nuts!

Helpful hint:  eat some more of these foods to avoid your chocolate cravings :)

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Lindsea Burns
Nutritional Therapy Practitioner (NTP)
Clinical Nutritionist
Email: lindsea@atlashealthcarecenter.com

________________________________________________

The views and opinions presented in this blog are those of the author
and do not necessarily represent the views or opinions of KMW.
________________________________________________

Two recipes for delicious, homemade, real food recovery drinks

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The last few weeks have focused on recovery.  We talked about the benefits of sleep, grounding, and the parasympathetic nervous system, and a few alternative therapies to help your body clear the metabolic wastes of exercise.  Today will conclude this mini-series with recipes for two recovery drinks, both of which will provide more complete nourishment than most pre-made drinks on the market, and have the added bonus of being real foods.  Both of the following recipes will help nourish, replenish and heal the body, and even support the parasympathetic nervous system.  They are both wonderful options but I have included some helpful hints to decide which recovery drink suits you best.

Chicken Broth

Rich in gelatin, collagen and minerals, chicken broth is a great recovery drink for the injury prone athlete.  Chicken broth also supports digestive function; so choose this recovery drink if you experience digestive symptoms like bloating, gas, IBS, or are sensitive to dairy or gluten.

Recipe

Whole chicken, free range, organic, soy free
2-4 Chicken feet
1 chicken back
4+ quarts purified water (not distilled)
2 T raw apple cider vinegar
Organic Vegetables, as desired, coarsely chopped: 1-2 medium yellow onions, 2-4 carrots, 3-4 celery stalks
Fresh herbs tied together with cooking twine, as desired: Bay leaf, Thyme, Rosemary, Sage
2 tsp Celtic sea salt

Roast the chicken in the oven at 350 for one hour.  Let cool, and remove the meat for dinner, meal prep, etc.  Place the carcass with the feet and back in a large stainless steel pot.  Fill the pot with enough purified water to cover the contents.  Add vinegar and let stand for 30 mins while the vinegar pulls minerals out of the bones.  Add remaining ingredients except salt.  Bring to a boil.  Reduce heat to a simmer and cook for 4-12 hours (I usually let mine cook overnight or while I am at work).  Stir occasionally and skim off anything floating to the top.  Add salt to taste.  Freeze extra in glass jars for 3 months.

Recovery drink: heat a cup of broth on the stove, add a spoonful of coconut oil and a generous pinch of sea salt

Raw Milk “Creamer”

The creamer has more carbohydrates than the chicken broth, so this is a better option after exceptionally high intensity workouts (think belt tests and hero WODs).  Rich in healthy saturated fats to support hormonal health, this creamer is also known to my clients as a fertility shake.  Choose the creamer if you have hormonal symptoms like PMS, polycystic ovarian syndrome, low testosterone, or have any concerns with your cholesterol or triglycerides.

Recipe

1 cup Raw whole milk (Organic Pastures or Claravale brand)
2 TBS Raw heavy cream (Organic Pastures or Claravale brand)
1 Raw egg yolk (from a free range chicken raised on pasture-I like Vital Farms brand)
Blend and serve J

Enjoy your homemade, nourishing, real food recovery drinks and stay healthy Krav Maga Worldwide!

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Lindsea Burns
Nutritional Therapy Practitioner (NTP)
Clinical Nutritionist
Email: lindsea@atlashealthcarecenter.com

________________________________________________

The views and opinions presented in this blog are those of the author
and do not necessarily represent the views or opinions of KMW.
________________________________________________

Our bodies need 7-9 hours of sleep each day.

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Recovery: Sleep

In my last post about recovery, I focused on rest and the benefits of balancing the sympathetic with the parasympathetic nervous system. The parasympathetic nervous system is your rest and digest program, which is crucial for optimal health and recovery.  This post will focus on sleep, which is the ultimate parasympathetic state.

Why?

During sleep, the body enters an enhanced state of rest and digest.  This is the time for the conscious brain and skeletal muscles to take a break, and for energy and resources to be rerouted to maintenance and repair processes.  Exercise takes a toll on the body, and if you want those micro-tears in your muscles to become bigger and stronger muscles instead of injuries, you need to sleep.

How much?

Our bodies need 7-9 hours of sleep each day.  Those of you with crazy jobs, small children or overactive social lives are laughing at me right now, but it is very important to prioritize sleep.  If you miss an hour of sleep each week night, you accumulate a “slept debt” of 5 hours by the weekend. So there is truth to the idea that we feel the need to “catch up” on the weekends, but most of us don’t have the time or ability to sleep an extra five hours!

When?

Everyone has their own schedule, but as a species, we have a biological clock that activates the majority of repair and heal processes during the hours of 2-4am.  If we are not asleep at this time, our recovery will be compromised.

How?

The sleep experts at the National Sleep Foundation recommend a cool, dark room free of clutter, LED lights and loud noises.  If you have trouble falling asleep, try using white noise, lavender, or some warm milk or tea.  It is also helpful to establish a bedtime routine, and to avoid heavy meals before bed.  Set a goal for yourself to be in bed (if not asleep) by a certain time each night. As that becomes more natural, move the time up by 15 minutes until you are getting your full 7-9 hours.
Now go buy yourself some blackout curtains, a fan and a lavender scented pillow and get in bed early tonight!

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Lindsea Burns
Nutritional Therapy Practitioner (NTP)
Clinical Nutritionist
Email: lindsea@atlashealthcarecenter.com

________________________________________________

The views and opinions presented in this blog are those of the author
and do not necessarily represent the views or opinions of KMW.
________________________________________________

 

Listen To Your Body and fight food cravings with help from Clinical Nutritionist Lindsea Burns!

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On Thursday, March 20th from 7:15pm to 8:00pm at KMW National Training Centers®  West L.A., KMW’s own Clinical Nutritionist Lindsea Burns will be giving another great nutrition lecture. Come check out Lindsea’s newest nutritional insight in her lecture titled,  Listen to Your Body: What Your Cravings Really Mean. Learn about your body’s innate intelligence, how to distinguish food addictions from actual nutrient cravings, and how to feed your body what it really needs. The seminar will be full of valuable information that will help you reach your training goals…and this seminar also includes a free demonstration of adrenal fatigue analysis and correction.

Please sign-up with the KMW West L.A. front desk, registration is $10.

Check out Lindsea’s nutrition blogs here.